MySQL Shell get_auto_increment_value() method – Python mode

These days, I mostly program in PHP with MySQL as the database, which is just fine by me. I have had a long-time interest in MySQL (SQL in general), and after several steady months of programming in PHP, I must say I have really come into the language and developed a fondness for it. All that being said, I still enjoy using and learning the MySQL Shell in Python mode. As Database Developers, we often need the LAST INSERT ID value from a previous INSERT statement on a column that has the AUTO_INCREMENT attribute. MySQL Shell has a get_auto_increment_value() method we can call against a Shell object result and retrieve that value. Continue reading and see examples of the MySQL Shell get_auto_increment_value() method used in Python mode…

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Use MySQL UNIQUE Constraint in phpMyAdmin

The MySQL UNIQUE constraint is often used in a column definition in which we need each value for that column to be distinct from the others. Perhaps it is an email column for an on-line registration form and we want to ensure that users cannot register twice for an account using the same email. Whatever the case may be, UNIQUE is there to help us ensure this type of data integrity or business requirement. What if the target table already exists and you determine you need to add a UNIQUE constraint to an existing column? In this post, I will cover 2 ways you can implement a UNIQUE constraint on existing columns using the phpMyAdmin web interface…

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Basic Data Analysis with MySQL Shell Python mode

I recently watched a fantastic Python Pandas library tutorial series on YouTube. Without a doubt, Pandas is great for all sorts of data stuff. On the same token, MySQL Shell in Python mode is quite powerful in the sense that Python and the MySQL Shell (version >= 8.0) are somewhat united in the same environment. Although Pandas is in a league all its own when it comes to data analysis, between the power of MySQL and Python, we can also perform some basic analysis easily in MySQL Shell Python mode. In this blog post, I will cover some basic data analysis using Python mode in the MySQL Shell. Continue reading to see examples…

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PHP PDO lastInsertId() method with examples in MySQL

MySQL has an AUTO_INCREMENT column attribute which automatically generates a consistent integer value upon a successful (or not) INSERT. Oftentimes, this attribute is set on a column deemed the PRIMARY KEY. Therefore, providing a unique value for the column and ensuring each rows’ individual identity. The LAST_INSERT_ID() function returns the most recently generated value for a column with the AUTO_INCREMENT attribute. Many times, you use this value further in query processing (E.g., link a newly signed-on customers’ information to a joining table of orders, ensure referential integrity between parent and child tables using a FOREIGN KEY and PRIMARY KEY, INSERT into another related one-to-one table, etc…). The PDO PHP library has a like-named class method, lastInsertId(), which provides the same functionality as LAST_INSERT_ID() in a PHP context. In this post, I’ll visit lastInsertId() with a simple example. Continue reading to learn more…

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MySQL Shell Python mode for multiple ALTER TABLE statements – easily

There may come a time you need to rename one or more columns in an existing MySQL table for a variety of reasons. Using ALTER TABLE, to rename a column is an easy enough command. But, suppose there are multiple tables in the same database/schema that have the same-named column and all of those columns need to be renamed. That could be a lot of ALTER TABLE statements to type out. Save your energy and time, avoiding all of those ALTER TABLE commands all-together. If you are lucky enough to be working with a MySQL version > 8.0 then the Shell is your salvation. With just a few lines of Python code in \py mode, all of your trouble(s) and headache(s) are no more…

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