MySQL DROP statement using phpMyAdmin

The MySQL DROP statement is one of many powerful DDL commands. Be it ALTER TABLE some_table DROP some_column or DROP some_table, this type of command can drastically change your data landscape because in executing MySQL DROP, you are completely removing objects from the database! If you are using the phpMyAdmin web interface, you can execute the MySQL DROP statement with just a few mouse clicks. Continue reading to see how…

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MySQL Shell Python mode for multiple ALTER TABLE statements – easily

There may come a time you need to rename one or more columns in an existing MySQL table for a variety of reasons. Using ALTER TABLE, to rename a column is an easy enough command. But, suppose there are multiple tables in the same database/schema that have the same-named column and all of those columns need to be renamed. That could be a lot of ALTER TABLE statements to type out. Save your energy and time, avoiding all of those ALTER TABLE commands all-together. If you are lucky enough to be working with a MySQL version > 8.0 then the Shell is your salvation. With just a few lines of Python code in \py mode, all of your trouble(s) and headache(s) are no more…

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Dynamic MySQL CREATE TABLE statement with pandas and pyodbc

Have you ever had to type out a massive CREATE TABLE statement by hand? One with dozens of columns? Maybe several dozens of columns? There are likely some GUI tools to help with large CREATE TABLE commands. Or, other drag-n-drop types of software that I am not familiar with. What if you could write a few lines of Python code and take care of a huge CREATE TABLE statement with way less effort than typed manually? Interested? Continue reading and see how using pandas, pyodbc, and MySQL…

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TRIM() string function in MySQL – with examples.

In this post, I’ll cover examples of the MySQL TRIM() function. TRIM() removes specific characters – or spaces – from a given string, at either: the beginning, ending, or potentially in both locations depending on several factors. With an optional keyword argument that controls which character(s) – if any – are removed, TRIM() can be tricky so let’s gain understanding with several easy-to-digest examples…

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Sorting associative arrays in PHP with array_multisort() – New learning

If you write MySQL queries, at some point you are going to have to provide query results in a specific order. To impose any ordering in MySQL (this applies to SQL overall and is not directed only at MySQL), you have to use the ORDER BY clause. Without it, there is no guaranteed order. The database is free to send back query results in any order. As I learn PHP, I make it a point to explore both the MySQL side, along with the PHP side in regards to similar type tasks and the efficiency of each. So far in my PHP journey, I have found that arrays are used quite extensively. In this post, I’ll cover array_multisort() – one of many in-built PHP functions – used for sorting arrays. In the context of the example data for this post, the arrays are populated by an unordered MySQL query. Let’s see one example of how you can establish a sorting order in a PHP array, that is populated from an unordered MySQL query…

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