Basic Data Analysis with MySQL Shell Python mode

I recently watched a fantastic Python Pandas library tutorial series on YouTube. Without a doubt, Pandas is great for all sorts of data stuff. On the same token, MySQL Shell in Python mode is quite powerful in the sense that Python and the MySQL Shell (version >= 8.0) are somewhat united in the same environment. Although Pandas is in a league all its own when it comes to data analysis, between the power of MySQL and Python, we can also perform some basic analysis easily in MySQL Shell Python mode. In this blog post, I will cover some basic data analysis using Python mode in the MySQL Shell. Continue reading to see examples…

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MySQL DROP statement using phpMyAdmin

The MySQL DROP statement is one of many powerful DDL commands. Be it ALTER TABLE some_table DROP some_column or DROP some_table, this type of command can drastically change your data landscape because in executing MySQL DROP, you are completely removing objects from the database! If you are using the phpMyAdmin web interface, you can execute the MySQL DROP statement with just a few mouse clicks. Continue reading to see how…

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MySQL Shell Python mode blog posts compilation

Over the last few months, I have written numerous blog posts on different features of the MySQL Shell ranging from basic CRUD to aggregate functions and DDL. As a part of the MySQL version 8 release, MySQL Shell is a powerful and alternative environment that you can manage and work with your data in using a choice of 3 languages: Python, Javascript, or SQL. So this blog post is a simple compilation of all the Python mode related posts, in one easy-to-access location…

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PHP PDO lastInsertId() method with examples in MySQL

MySQL has an AUTO_INCREMENT column attribute which automatically generates a consistent integer value upon a successful (or not) INSERT. Oftentimes, this attribute is set on a column deemed the PRIMARY KEY. Therefore, providing a unique value for the column and ensuring each rows’ individual identity. The LAST_INSERT_ID() function returns the most recently generated value for a column with the AUTO_INCREMENT attribute. Many times, you use this value further in query processing (E.g., link a newly signed-on customers’ information to a joining table of orders, ensure referential integrity between parent and child tables using a FOREIGN KEY and PRIMARY KEY, INSERT into another related one-to-one table, etc…). The PDO PHP library has a like-named class method, lastInsertId(), which provides the same functionality as LAST_INSERT_ID() in a PHP context. In this post, I’ll visit lastInsertId() with a simple example. Continue reading to learn more…

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Use phpMyAdmin to change column name and datatype in MySQL

Using the MySQL ALTER TABLE command, you can easily change an existing columns’ name and datatype. With just a few clicks, you can do the same in the phpMyAdmin visual web interface. For many developers, this interface is the one they lean on most while programming so it can’t hurt to know how to do it yourself should you find yourself programming in this environment…

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